Be in the driver’s seat from any seat

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What’s better than driving a Ford? Driving it smarter with FordPass.™164  Contact your dealer, schedule maintenance with a Ford Service Specialist, reserve parking ahead of time with FordPass Park or request Roadside Assistance166  at the tap of a button. Need help with your journey? Contact a friendly FordGuide right from the app.

FordPass takes care of the details so you can just enjoy the drive. Learn more at FordPass.com or download it right now for iOS or Android™.

 

SYNC® 3

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With SYNC 3, you can enjoy all of the great SYNC features, plus our next generation of voice-activated technology.27

  • Smart hardware meets smart software with an easy-to-read color touchscreen
  • Experience quick reactions to your commands
  • Capacitive touchscreen features impressive responsiveness such as the convenient swipe feature
  • Talk with real-world voice commands
  • Locate your favorite restaurants with simple destination entry via the optional navigation
  • Bring the power of Siri® Eyes Free and your iPhone® into your vehicle48

 

Full-size SUV capability along with NHTSA’s highest Government 5-Star Safety Rating

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You’d expect the flagship of Ford SUVs to be top-rated in safety. And it is. The 2017 Expedition was awarded the highest overall 5-Star Crash Safety Rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).* Expedition comes with dual-stage front airbags and side-impact airbags, as well as three-point safety belts for all eight seating positions. Standard also is the Safety Canopy® System with three-row side-curtain airbags and rollover sensor. And Expedition features AdvanceTrac® with RSC® (Roll Stability Control™) and Trailer Sway Control to help you avoid an accident in the first place.

Cargo Space

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The full-size Ford Expedition offers exceptional cargo space when you need it. With regular- and extended-length (EL) models, Expedition offers the cargo-carrying capability that’s right for you, up to a best-in-class* maximum 130.8 cu. ft. in EL. And with 4×2 and 4×4 configurations, you can take whatever you’re carrying just about anywhere.

Four engines. One soul.

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Fasten your safety belts. Each engine delivers at least 300 horsepower. The 3.7L V6 offers up 300 hp and 280 lb.-ft. of torque, standard on V6 Fastback model. The 2.3L EcoBoost® engines churns out 310 hp* and 320 lb.-ft. of torque,* standard on EcoBoost© and EcoBoost Premium models. The 5.0L V8 kicks out 435 hp* and 400 lb.-ft. of torque,* standard on GT and GT Premium models. And the 5.2L V8 delivers 526 hp and 429 lb.-ft. of torque, standard on the Shelby GT350©.

Gas Tanks: Why Aren’t All Fuel Doors on the Same Side?

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Quick: On which side is your vehicle’s fuel door?

Must you look at the little diamond-shaped arrow on the fuel gauge EVERY time you fill up to know whichFuel-Gauge-Arrow-iStock side holds the fuel filler? Have you ever pulled to the fuel island to discover you’re on the wrong side? Did you utter bad words before or after you said, “Why don’t they put fuel doors on the same side of every car?!?”

The answer to that question is complicated, if not convoluted.

Based on my research into the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, I came to the conclusion (a conclusion later supported by my contacts at both the Ford Motor Company and Nissan North America) that no U.S. government regulation concerns which side on which the fuel door must be positioned. Much to the chagrin of many motorists, the fuel door can be on either side.

With no legal or marketing motivation, and scant ownership enjoyment implications, car-company engineers are free to place fuel doors on whichever side offers the easiest packaging, according to Ford spokesman Mark Schirmer. He added that there’s not enough room — and no demand — for dual fuel doors.

Preference

Americans prefer left-mounted fuel doors, said Schirmer, referencing a Ford study. A driver’s-side fuel door makes it easier for drivers to place the car’s left fender close to fuel pump. Still, fuel door location is typically not part of the buying decision, added Schirmer.

Those in Japan, India, the United Kingdom, Australia, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and countries in southern Africa drive on the left side of the road and sit on the right side of the car, and it appears they prefer right-mounted fuel doors, given the tendencies of cra manufacturers. For at least 25 years, the conventional wisdom among auto writers has been that Europeans like right-side doors. However, when I posed this to my industry co-horts, no car company would speculate if or why that might be true.

Nissan, like most automakers, produces some vehicles with left fuel doors and some with right doors.

Reasons

“The placement of the fuel door is mainly a factor of fuel tank design, location and underbody packaging,” Nissan’s Steve Yaeger wrote in an email. “With all of the structure and components located underneath the vehicle, (engineers) would quickly encounter restrictions in trying to route the filler tube to the same side on every vehicle.”

If mechanisms such as a “big, honkin’ speaker” must be placed on the left side, engineers put the fuel door on the right, notes Schirmer.

The bottom line: Fuel door position is not a random choice, but if engineers have a good reason to place fuel doors on the right, that’s where they go.

If you can’t remember the location of your fuel door, don’t be ashamed to look at the little diamond-arrow on your fuel gauge … BEFORE you pull up to the pump.

Tips for Checking Your Tire Pressure

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Proper maintenance of your car can be crucial for its long life and safe operation. Your tires are one of the most important parts of your car; literally the place where the rubber meets the road. Regular care and maintenance are crucial to the safe and reliable performance of your vehicle.

The air pressure inside your tires needs to be checked regularly to help ensure your vehicle runs smoothly and efficiently. Underinflated tires can contribute to increased wear and tear, and also reduce fuel efficiency, says Edmunds. Tires can lose air in a variety of ways, including a tiny hole, a leak on the the valve stem or an issue with the wheel on which it’s mounted, according to Popular Mechanics. In addition, changing temperatures can affect the air pressure of your tires. Tire pressure can vary 1-2 pounds per square inch (psi) for every 10-degree difference in ambient temperature, according to Goodyear. Keep in mind, it can be difficult to tell if a radial tire needs air just by looking at it, so tires should be checked.

When Should I Check?

Tires warm up when your car is moving. Air expands inside a “hot” tire, so the air pressure reading will likely not be accurate for a hot tire. Tire air pressure should be checked once a month when the tires are cold, says Edmunds. But, you may want to consider checking your tire pressure more frequently in the following instances, which may make the affect the pressure:

  • If you run over a sharp object, like a nail, that can puncture the rubber.
  • If you strike a curb or other object.
  • If the weather suddenly changes from warm to cold.

If your car has a tire pressure sensor and the light on the dashboard is illuminated, you should check the tire pressure immediately on all four tires, says Bridgestone.

How Should I Check?

Edmunds recommends some simple steps for properly checking tire pressure:

Step 1. Purchase a tire gauge. Tire gauges are small enough to fit in your glove box, and they’re a handy tool to have. The newer digital tire gauges can be more accurate — and easier to read — than the older ones. If you don’t want to purchase a gauge, you can go to the air pump at a gas station, which usually has a gauge on the hose. That’s convenient, because if you find that your tires need air, you’re already there.

Step 2. Discover the proper air pressure for your car. Tire pressure is measured in pounds per square inch, or psi. You can often find the right psi for your vehicle on a yellow sticker inside the driver’s-side door jamb, or you can consult your owner’s manual. Remember, the ideal air pressure may be different for the front and rear tires.

Step 3. Remove the air valve cap from your tire. It’s easy to lose this little valve cap. Be sure to place it in your pocket or someplace where it will not roll away or quickly disappear.

Step 4. Press the tire gauge against the open valve stem. You will hear a hiss of air as you press down. Don’t be concerned; this is normal.

Step 5. Read the air pressure gauge. The number will appear on the dial or digital screen on the tire gauge. Compare this number with the recommended tire pressure for the tire. If it’s too low, you can add air. If the pressure is too high, you can let air out of the tire.